Aniruddha Roy Choudhary’s latest movie, PINK, has been a critical and commercial success in India 

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pinkA blazing courtroom drama, PINK has wowed critics and audiences alike and actress Taapsee Pannu, who plays Delhi-based event manager Meenal Arora, is being heralded as the face of a new brand of strong Indian woman.

PINK is the story of three girls (Taapsee Pannu, Kirti Kulhari and Andrea Tariang) who are molested by Rajveer (Angad Bedi) but are instead charged of assault for attacking the molester.

The Indian Express called it, “A blazing indictment of all that’s wrong with us”. While the Times of India said, “PINK is a powerful statement on the existing feudal mindset of a majority of India, where men and women are judged by a different yardstick”.

MailOnline spoke to Taapsee about PINK, and the rights of other independent Indian women who take great encouragement in PINK’s narrative as three girls fight for the right to lead a life on their own terms.

Taapsee is currently shooting Naam Shabana, an action thriller narrating the story of a Muslim girl’s journey to become a secret agent.

The success of PINK, has opened the door for the actress to take up strong characters and her career is expected to blossom after such a commanding performance.

“PINK made me the brand ambassador of women fighting and raising a voice for their rights. Its heartening to note that the movie sent across the message without being too preachy,” says Taapsee.

‘When a woman says ‘no’ she means NO’ was the message that Pink offered, and ever since the movie was released in September, Taapsee has been giving speeches, attending seminars to talk about the life of urban, young women and their freedom to explore their sexuality.

3977c19300000578-3844638-image-a-21_1476747925381Taking her journey forward, Taapsee will soon be seen in Naam Shabana along with Akshay Kumar – a prequel to hit 2015 action thriller Baby, which was directed by Neeraj Pandey.

Taapsee’s small yet defining action sequence in Baby had left her fans asking for more.

“Naam Shabana is revolutionary in its own way as it is about hardship faced by Indian women who intend to work as an undercover agent,” said Taapsee.

“I was told that my small action role in Baby was smashing and they wanted to see more. The movie will take the audience to the journey for which I am learning Japanese martial arts,” she adds.

A normal middle-class girl from a Sikh family, Taapsee was more inclined towards achieving her academic goals as a kid, and her only association with the arts was her weekly Kathak and Bharatnatyam lessons.

It was only when she received an offer letter from tech giant Infosys when Taapsee finished her engineering studies that she realised her true calling was to be an actor.

A normal middle-class girl from a Sikh family, Taapsee was more inclined towards achieving her academic goals as a kid, and her only association with the arts was her weekly Kathak and Bharatnatyam lessons.

It was only when she received an offer letter from tech giant Infosys when Taapsee finished her engineering studies that she realised her true calling was to be an actor.

A short modelling stint, and a whopping 23 southern films later, Taapsee finally made a foray into Bollywood movies with the David Dhawan’s Chasme Baddoor.

But her performance in PINK has propelled her to a much higher level.

“PINK has reflected the times that we are living in. We all dream of having a clean and a safe society, but, do not want to work for it.

“Nobody wants to speak about it and no one really care to create a safe society,” says Taapsee, who has so far answered umpteen emails sent by women from all across south-Asia, discussing subjugation and exploitation of women.

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